collapse

Author Topic: Android Memory and Storage  (Read 1423 times)

Offline S.Prime

  • PM if You have a Forum Issue
  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2017
  • Popularity: 80
  • Galaxy S3-TPT-HTC Flyer-Nexus 7 & 10-Rooted 100%
    • View Profile
Android Memory and Storage
« on: September 19, 2012, 05:41:23 PM »

A post by our administrator Babyfacemegee drew comments yesterday when he used the term memory to describe internal storage, but interestingly the following help topic from Google Support states that apps use two types of memory, internal storage and RAM. I am the first to admit that this goes against my Microsoft Windows mindset, but we are using Google's Android. Also, if you have ever wondered about the two squares at the bottom of the Nexus 7's screen that shows your recent apps, look at the section below describing "Show Cached Processes" and you see your recent app as a cached process with a usage value. Notably when I tap the double squares and swipe the app to remove it from the list it is removed from cached processes. As my tablet is rooted, I cannot guarantee the same results, but report your results, if you test cached processes in relation to the recent apps feature and note if you are rooted or stock.




Quote
Optimize memory usage



You typically don’t need to worry about managing apps beyond installing, opening, and using them. But there may be times when you want to know more about what's happening behind the scenes.
 
Apps use two kinds of memory: internal storage and RAM. They use internal storage for themselves and any files, settings, and other data they use. They also use RAM (memory designed for temporary storage and fast access) when they're running.
 
Android manages and carefully guards the portion of internal storage where the system, apps, and most data for those apps are stored, because this area may contain your private information. It's not possible to view this portion of internal storage when you connect your device to a computer with a USB cable. The other portion of internal storage, where music, downloaded files, and so on are stored, remains visible for your convenience.
 
Android also manages how apps use RAM. It may cache some things you’ve been using recently, for quicker access if you need them again, but it will erase the cache if it needs the RAM for new activities.
 
You affect the way apps use internal storage directly and indirectly in many ways—for example, by:

 •Installing or uninstalling apps.

 •Downloading files in Browser, Gmail, and other apps.

 •Creating files (for example, by taking pictures).

 •Deleting downloaded files or files you created.

 •Copying files between your device and a computer via USB or Bluetooth.
 
You rarely need to manage the way apps use RAM. But you can monitor apps' RAM usage and stop them if they misbehave.

Use the Apps screen
 
The Apps screen allows you to adjust several aspects of the way your device uses memory.

To view these settings:

1.From a Home or All Apps screen, touch the Settings icon .

2.Under Device, touch Apps.
 
You'll see three tabs at the top of the screen, each displaying a list of apps or their components:

 •Downloaded. Displays apps you’ve downloaded on Google Play or other sources.

 •Running. Displays all apps, processes, and services that are currently running or that have cached processes, and how much RAM they are using.

 The graph at the bottom of the Running tab shows the total RAM in use and the amount free. Below the graph, touch Show cached processes or Show running services to switch back and forth.
 
•All. Displays all apps that came with Android and all apps you downloaded on Google Play or other sources.
 
To switch the order of the lists displayed in the Downloaded or All tabs, touch Menu icon> Sort by name or Sort by size.

To view details about an app or other item listed under any tab, touch its name. The information and controls available vary among different types of apps, but commonly include:

 •Force stop button: Stops an app that is misbehaving. Stopping an app, process, or service may cause your device to stop working correctly. You may need to restart your device after doing this.

 •Uninstall button: Deletes the app and all of its data and settings.

 •Disable button: Prevents the app from running, but does not uninstall it. This option is available for some apps and services that can't be uninstalled.

 •Clear data button: Delete an app’s settings and other data without removing the app itself.

•Clear cache: If the app stores data in a temporary area of the phone's memory, lists how much information is stored, and includes a button for clearing it.

 •Launch by default: If you have configured an app to launch certain file types by default, you can clear that setting here.

 •Permissions: Lists the kinds of information about your phone and data the app has access to.
 


The link to the entire help topic can be seen Here.
« Last Edit: September 20, 2012, 02:04:30 PM by Babyfacemagee »


IT Service Professional - I just want a device to be productive.

Offline bjs229

  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2682
  • Popularity: 47
    • View Profile
Re: Android Memory and Storage
« Reply #1 on: September 19, 2012, 07:36:42 PM »
Thanks for the good info here

Offline strollin

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 63
  • Popularity: 1
    • View Profile
Re: Android Memory and Storage
« Reply #2 on: September 27, 2012, 09:24:33 AM »
I'm curious about this statement "...apps use two types of memory, internal storage and RAM.  I am the first to admit that this goes against my Microsoft Windows mindset...". 

Why do you think this any different than Windows?

A Windows application also uses 2 types of memory, internal storage (the program and it's assorted files are stored on your hdd or ssd) and RAM for when the program is running.

Offline S.Prime

  • PM if You have a Forum Issue
  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2017
  • Popularity: 80
  • Galaxy S3-TPT-HTC Flyer-Nexus 7 & 10-Rooted 100%
    • View Profile
Re: Android Memory and Storage
« Reply #3 on: September 27, 2012, 10:29:10 AM »
For clarification, the reference was to Google Support using the term "memory" in describing internal storage and RAM, where as with my Windows thinking only RAM is memory, which had been pointed out by another member in a post by our Administrator on the previous day.
IT Service Professional - I just want a device to be productive.

 


* Top Boards

* 'Like' And 'Follow' Us!

* Top Posters

bjs229 bjs229
2682 Posts
JayJ JayJ
2100 Posts
S.Prime S.Prime
2017 Posts
Babyfacemagee Babyfacemagee
1261 Posts
matt matt
936 Posts
birdastrompgman birdastrompgman
840 Posts
loociddreemr loociddreemr
708 Posts